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Menhirs d'Epoigny

Archaeological site, Mégalith in Couches
  • A group of seven menhirs dating back some 5,000 years, erected by the Neolithic civilisation. Later, the Gauls dedicated this site to Epogne, the goddess of horsemen. Their heights are respectively: 7.35 m, 5.60 m, 5.30 m, 4 m, 2.83 m, 2 m. This is the most important megalithic site in Burgundy.
    The largest menhir (7.35 m) is a block of Brandon granite (a local stone) weighing 30 tons, called the Pierre des Tourteaux.
    These menhirs, whose engravings bear witness to the ancient phases of...
    A group of seven menhirs dating back some 5,000 years, erected by the Neolithic civilisation. Later, the Gauls dedicated this site to Epogne, the goddess of horsemen. Their heights are respectively: 7.35 m, 5.60 m, 5.30 m, 4 m, 2.83 m, 2 m. This is the most important megalithic site in Burgundy.
    The largest menhir (7.35 m) is a block of Brandon granite (a local stone) weighing 30 tons, called the Pierre des Tourteaux.
    These menhirs, whose engravings bear witness to the ancient phases of megalithic art, were buried and were excavated in 1984 for 6 of them, and 1990 for the last one, a few metres from their original locations. The excavation of the stones uncovered some flints and ceramics attesting to the occupation of the site from the Neolithic to the Gallo-Roman period. Under the megalith, a funerary stele dated to the Final Bronze Age was also found.
    Since 1840, one of the menhirs has served as a parapet for the Vigny bridge. When the bridge was rebuilt, the municipality decided to relocate it near the other menhirs.
Services
  • Equipment
    • Picnic area