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Château de Chissey-en-Morvan

Castles and Defense Sites, Listed or registered (CNMHS), Medieval in Chissey-en-Morvan
  • The first known master of Chissey, Eudes, in 1271, was the son of a lord of Roussillon.

    Abbot Doret, parish priest of Chissey at the end of the 19th century, writes that the estate belonged to the barony of the bishops of Autun, who themselves held it in "arrière-fief" from the Dukes of Burgundy, and had made it a property of a lay lord.

    The domain of Chissey was described as a "fortified house with ditches and a mill".

    The marriage of Isabeau de Chissey made it pass into the de Chaugy...
    The first known master of Chissey, Eudes, in 1271, was the son of a lord of Roussillon.

    Abbot Doret, parish priest of Chissey at the end of the 19th century, writes that the estate belonged to the barony of the bishops of Autun, who themselves held it in "arrière-fief" from the Dukes of Burgundy, and had made it a property of a lay lord.

    The domain of Chissey was described as a "fortified house with ditches and a mill".

    The marriage of Isabeau de Chissey made it pass into the de Chaugy family in 1374.

    The construction of the main building and its outbuildings dates back to the middle of the 15th century.
    It would be the work of Michaut de Chaugy, who knew a brilliant fortune in the service of the Dukes of Burgundy, Philippe le Bon and Charles le Téméraire.

    In 1558, Chissey was sold by the de Chaugy family to Claude Regnier de Montmoyen, President of the Dijon Chamber of Accounts
    of the Chamber of Accounts of Dijon. His grandson, Odinet de Montmoyen, ligueur and governor of Autun, took charge of the
    the necessary repairs in the Renaissance style at the end of the 16th century.

    The abbot Doret places in 1608 the marriage of Marie de Montmoyen, daughter of Odinet, with Léonard de Chissey, who had distinguished himself at the siege of Autun, and takes over the name of the seigneury.

    Their daughter Chrétienne de Chissey died without issue in 1685, and the castle was eventually sold to the
    Fussey family in the 18th century.

    During the Revolution, it was recovered as national property and sold in 1796 (14 Thermidor, Year IV) to a notable person from the Revolution, Joseph Brochot de Villiers and his cousin Hubinet de Soubise, whose families had the frame of the dungeon restored in 1867 and opened many large bays (north-west tower, main building and north-east tower).

    From about 1880 until 1992, the castle was used for agricultural purposes. It was sold in 1992 and remained unoccupied until it was sold again in 2003, and the first restorations did not begin until 2004.
  • Spoken languages
    • French
  • Accepted customers
    • Individuals
    • Groups
Services
  • Equipment
    • Picnic area
    • Parking
  • Rates
  • Gratuities
    From 0 €